AbpAndrew[Rymarenko]: A Retrospective Look After 40 Years

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Barbara
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AbpAndrew[Rymarenko]: A Retrospective Look After 40 Years

Postby Barbara » Thu 12 July 2018 4:56 am

Actually, this year marks a half century since Archbishop Andrei's consecration as a Bishop [ 1968 ] as well as 40 years from his repose tomorrow, the Feast of Sts Peter and Paul.

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Helping Metropolitan Anastassy {Gribanovsky} of Rocor

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With Metropolitan Philaret {Vosnesensky} ( does anyone know who the glowering cleric behind them might be ?! )

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The beginnings of Novo-Diveevo Convent essentially founded by then Protopriest Adrian [Rymarenko], later Archbishop Andrei of Rockland, as pictured on the left holding his mitre

1st, the official versions of Abp Andrei's life, then some other details. Here is the write up from Novo-Diveevo itself - edited just a hair :

Archbishop Andrew then Protopresbyter Adrian Rimarenko, arrived from Germany, to the US along with his group of Russian émigrés in 1949. They were refugees, seeking to escape the yoke of communist rule. The group settled in Rockland County, in the Village of Nyack, New York and immediately opened a church. As others gathered around them a community began to form. At the request of Archbishops Nikon (Rklitzky) of Florida and Washington D. C. and Seraphim (Ivanov) of the Holy Trinity Monastery Father Adrian began gathering displaced female monastics in the Russian Diaspora and so Novo-Diveevo was established.

In 1951 a former Catholic convent was purchased with the help of several parishioners, a kind banker and whatever funds the group had.

Novo-Diveevo was moved within the Town of Clarkstown, in an area that was known as Spring Valley, but now is officially the hamlet of Nanuet , New York. They began their life in the New World with no means of subsistence, no knowledge of the English language, and no governmental assistance. But they had one desire in common – to freely worship God, to thank Him for the joy of their newfound freedom, which had been given to them by this unfamiliar and – for many – utterly unknown and incomprehensible land. It was Father Adrian’s dream to build not only a church and convent, but also an Orthodox cemetery and an old-age home to care for the elderly émigrés. In 1968, Father Adrian became Bishop Andrew of Rockland.

Until his final days, Archbishop Andrew continued to lead the spiritual life of the convent, delving as much as his health allowed him into the minutiae of monastic and practical life. Archbishop Andrew reposed on the feast day of Saint's Peter and Paul - July 12, 1978. - https://novo-diveevo.org

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A further expansion of Archbishop Andrei's Bio from the 35th anniversary of his repose :

Friday, July 12, 2013, the feast of the Holy Leaders of the Apostles SS. Peter and Paul, marked the 35th anniversary of the repose of the ever-memorable Archbishop Andrei (Rymarenko) of Rockland, vicar of the Eastern American Diocese. As a Protopriest, Fr Adrian (in monasticism Andrei) founded Holy Dormition Convent "Novo-Diveevo" in Nanuet, NY. Archbishop Nikon (Rklitsky +1976 г.)recorded this history in his compilation, My Work in the Vineyard of Christ:

The idea to found Holy Dormition Convent – a "New Diveevo" ? in the United States was first conceived in 1946, with the arrival in America of new Russian emigres after the Second World War, by Bishop Seraphim (Ivanov) and Bishop Nikon (Rklitsky). Certain preparatory measures were taken by the Diocesan Administration of the North American and Canadian Diocese, but the founding of the convent itself was realized in the summer of 1949, with the arrival from Europe of Protopriest Adrian Rymarenko, later Archbishop of Rockland, with a group of loyal collaborators. It was namely Protopriest Rymarenko who was tasked by Archbishop Vitaly (Maximenko) with founding this convent under the supervision of his vicar, Bishop Nikon of Florida.

Fr Adrian accomplished this undertaking with great success, approaching his task with zeal and an experience and talent that came naturally to him. He himself came from a lay background; his father was an industrialist in Russia. Fr Adrian received his education in a Realschule [an advanced secondary school – ed.], as well as at the St Petersburg Polytechnical Institute. He was received into the priesthood in accordance with his own spiritual wishes, and during the first years of the Bolshevik Revolution, at a time of the brutal repression of the Church by the Bolsheviks. While still a student in St Petersburg, Fr Adrian occupied himself with religious issues and was a student of the renowned theologian Fr Ioann Yegorov; his spiritual formation was further influenced by the Optina Elders, with whom he corresponded. He had a close relationship with Elder Anatoly, a disciple of Elder Ambrose, with Elder Nektary and with the last Optina Elder – Monk Vikenty, who, after the destruction of the Optina Hermitage by the Bolsheviks, lived with Fr Adrian for some time. It was these gracious acquaintances, as well as Fr Adrian’s natural gifts, that gave him an opportunity to be an experienced spiritual leader and outstanding administrator and organizer. After the repose of Fr Adrian’s matushka, also a remarkable Russian woman, Eugenia Grigorievna, on October 1/14, 1963, Fr Adrian accepted monastic tonsure with the name Andrei, and in 1968 was consecrated Bishop of Rockland, vicar of the Diocese of Eastern American and New York. On Bishop Andrei’s 80th birthday, March 15/28, 1973, for his outstanding accomplishments, he was elevated to the rank of Archbishop of Rockland.

Under Fr Adrian’s direction, Novo-Diveevo convent underwent many stages of growth and development… Among Fr Adrian’s most active assistants were his matushka, Eugenia Grigorievna, and his longtime and loyal collaborators, who left Russia with him: Prince DV Mishetsky, Dr AP Timofievich, and choir conductor PP Didenko...

Novo-Diveevo Convent is located approximately 25 miles from New York, in the Spring Valley region, and is a large Russian spiritual center. It comprises close to 40 nuns [fewer today—ed.] and novices, and 40 residents in a home for the elderly. The convent has two wonderful churches – a small one in the house first acquired by the convent, and another of medium size, built by the monastics. Among the multitude of holy items kept in its churches, the most remarkable are: an icon of the Vladimir Mother of God, smuggled out of Optina Hermitage, and a portrait of Venerable Seraphim of Sarov in the smaller church, which was painted during the saint’s lifetime. The full cycle of divine services is served daily at the convent, while on Sundays and feast days many of the faithful gather there. The convent is also home to a quickly growing Russian cemetery, now numbering over 2,000 graves. The real estate acquired by the convent over the years is now valued at several hundred thousand dollars. [ Probably MUCH more than that -- especially now, 5 years later ?]

One no less remarkable feat of Archbishop Andrei’s was the construction at the convent in 1972 of a large building to handle the needs of the convent and serve as a home for elderly women… Now half of this spacious building accommodates the nuns, while in the other reside these elderly women, who are grateful to God and Archbishop Andrei for taking care of them in their old age, and all financial obligations are cared for.

It bears noting that, for all of his great accomplishments, Archbishop Andrei was not a well man – in recent years, he [ could not ] even perform the divine services.

So it was that the evaluation given of Archbishop Andrei, then Protopriest Rymarenko, upon his arrival in America in 1949, that "his health is poor, and he is in no condition to undertake active work," was brilliantly disproved, while the words of God were confirmed: "for My strength is made perfect in weakness" (II Corinthians 12:9).

http://www.pravmir.com/the-35th-anniver ... vo-diveevo

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Barbara
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Re: AbpAndrew[Rymarenko]: A Retrospective Look After 40 Years

Postby Barbara » Fri 13 July 2018 5:00 am

Before the Feast Day of St Peter and Paul - and the repose of Archbishop Andrew [Rymarenko] of Rockland - ends, I want to recount a little.

Apparently, those who went to Confession with Fr Adrian marveled at his incisive wisdom. They report that he never left a stone unturned, trying to extract the most hidden sin at its root.
Anecdotal evidence shows he displayed evidence of clairvoyance in the arena of Confession [ whether also in other areas of life, I don't know. If anybody does, please mention here ].

This is very much an Optina trait. Elder Barsanuphius was a more recent example of this type of "Confessional Clairvoyance". The former Colonel in the Army of the Tsar would remind his spiritual children of sins in earlier stages of their lives that they had buried so deeply away that even hints from the Elder did not produce that awaited moment of recognition. Finally, after the spiritual child had searched back in his or her memory to no avail, sharp detail of the incident was given by Elder Barsanuphius to jolt the memory of the astonished disciple.

St Barsanuphius' earlier predecessor as Skete Elder, St Ambrose, was unsurpassed in this category. Though all the Optina lineage of Elders excelled in seeing the life sins of their spiritual children and pilgrims and visitors.

Perhaps Fr Adrian acquired this Optina hallmark quality from his close discipleship with Elder Nektary. Fr Adrian brought it 1st to his church service in Europe [ Berlin ] and later across the ocean to the East Coast of the US. This outstanding ability does not automatically make Archbishop Andrei a clairvoyant Elder. But certainly when compared with some of today's products [ Ephraim of Arizona, for example ], he appears a solid, authentic spiritual teacher.

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Barbara
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Re: AbpAndrew[Rymarenko]: A Retrospective Look After 40 Years

Postby Barbara » Sun 5 August 2018 4:06 am

Unfortunately, not long ago, Novo-Diveevo Convent suffered a loss by fire of its candle factory. I didn't hear any further information as to the reason.

Regarding Elder Amvrosy's consummate skill in 'outing' submerged sins of his disciples, long lost to their conscious minds, see one example here : viewtopic.php?f=12&p=73510#p73510

I came here to write that an entire book was planned 20 years ago to be published called "Fr Adrian : Disciple of the Optina Elders". It never saw the light of day, at least up til now. Surely that would be very interesting.

I plan to summarize in this thread some known material about Archbishop Andrew's life.

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Barbara
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Re: AbpAndrew[Rymarenko]: A Retrospective Look After 40 Years

Postby Barbara » Wed 3 October 2018 4:15 am

An intriguing aspect of the Chain of Optina Elders and their devoted disciples is the fact that some observers felt that ardent students of one Elder would tend to take on his appearance over time.

Hence it is that Hieroschemamonk Flavian, the cellarer of Optina, was somehow mirrored in the future Archbishop Andrew [Rymarenko], who had a great devotion to Fr Flavian. The latter had been a cell attendant to Elder Macarius and a model Optina monk. After St Macarius' repose, Fr Flavian served as cell attendant to Elder Hilarion, whose repose day was yesterday, October 1.


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